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Information Services SDA: Survey Documentation and Analysis
DATASETS

Cross-study search study and variable level content of data sets currently available on this server.

Agriculture and Rural Studies

  Infectious diseases of East African livestock, 2007-2009: Theileria parva infection outcome data

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Abstract: The Infectious Diseases of East African Livestock (IDEAL) project was an epidemiological and longitudinal cohort study of cattle health in western Kenya with the aim of providing baseline epidemiological data, investigating the impact of different infections on key responses such as growth, mortality and morbidity, the additive and/or multiplicative effects of co-infections, and the influence of management and genetic factors. This study followed 548 calves over the first 51 weeks of life or until death; the microdata file contains 85 variables.

Principal investigator(s): Callaby, Rebecca; Woolhouse, Mark

Date: 2007-2009

Documentation

Educational Outcomes and Institutions

  Programme for international student assessment (PISA)

Series abstract: PISA is a triennial international survey which aims to evaluate education systems worldwide by testing the skills and knowledge of 15-year-old students. To date, students representing more than 70 economies have participated in the assessment.

Since the year 2000, every three years, fifteen-year-old students from randomly selected schools worldwide take tests in the key subjects: reading, mathematics and science, with a focus on one subject in each year of assessment. Students take a test that lasts 2 hours. The tests are a mixture of open-ended and multiple-choice questions that are organised in groups based on a passage setting out a real-life situation. A total of about 390 minutes of test items are covered. Students take different combinations of different tests. The students and their school principals also answer questionnaires to provide information about the students' backgrounds, schools and learning experiences and about the broader school system and learning environment.

Principal investigator(s): Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)


2012 PISA surveys - access SDA data:

  Student questionnaire data School questionnaire data Parent questionnaire data Cognitive item response data Scored cognitive item response data Questionnaires, codebooks, frequencies, etc.
Main survey data
Financial literacy data
Computer-Based Assessment (CBA) data

Abstract: Around 510,000 students in 65 economies took part in the PISA 2012 assessment of reading, mathematics and science representing about 28 million 15-year-olds globally. Of those economies, 44 took part in an assessment of creative problem solving and 18 in an assessment of financial literacy.


2009 PISA surveys - access SDA data:

  Student questionnaire data School questionnaire data Parent questionnaire data Cognitive item response data Scored cognitive item response data Questionnaires, codebooks, frequencies, etc.
Main survey data
Electronic Reading Assessment (ERA) data  

Abstract: The 2009 survey assessed the competencies of 15-year-olds in reading, mathematics and science (with a focus on reading) in 65 countries and economies. In 2010 students from a further 9 countries and economies took the PISA 2009 test.


2006 PISA surveys - access SDA data:

  Student questionnaire data School questionnaire data Parent questionnaire data Cognitive item response data Scored cognitive item response data Questionnaires, codebooks, frequencies, etc.
Main survey data In process

Abstract: The PISA 2006 database includes information on nearly 400,000 students from 57 countries. The database includes not only information on student performance in the three main areas of assessment – reading, mathematics and science – but also their responses to the student questionnaire that they completed as part of the assessment. Data from the school principals of participating schools are also included.


2003 PISA surveys - access SDA data:

  Student questionnaire data School questionnaire data Test item response data Questionnaires, codebooks, frequencies, etc.
Main survey data

Abstract: PISA 2003 is the second assessment in the Programme: the first survey was in 2000. Well over a quarter of a million students in 41 countries took part in a two-hour test in their schools, assessing their skills in mathematics, reading, science and problem solving. All 30 OECD member countries participated, as well as 11 partner countries. New in PISA 2003: (a) established a detailed profile of student performance in mathematics (in PISA 2000, the focus was on reading); (b) a new part of the survey assesses students’ problem-solving skills, providing for the first time a direct assessment of life competencies that apply across different areas of the school curriculum; (c) >makes comparisons over time possible. This must be approached with caution, however, since two results do not make a trend and since education systems develop relatively slowly.


2000 PISA surveys - access SDA data:

  Student questionnaire and mathematics achievement data Student questionnaire and reading achievement data Student questionnaire and science achievement data School questionnaire data Test item response data Questionnaires, codebooks, frequencies, etc.
Main survey data In process

Abstract: The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a collaborative effort among the participating countries to measure how well 15-year-olds, approaching the end of compulsory schooling, are prepared to meet the challenges of today’s societies. PISA administers tests and background questionnaires to between 4,500 and 10,000 students in each participating country to assess three forms of literacy: reading, mathematical and scientific. The assessments focus on how well students apply knowledge and skills to tasks that are relevant to their future life, rather than on the memorisation of subject matter knowledge. The assessment was first administered in 2000 in 32 countries, all but four of them members of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

  Research data management training survey, 2016

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Abstract:The aim of this survey was to collect feedback about existing training programmes in research data management for researchers at the University of Edinburgh, as well as researchers’ preferred methods for training, and their requirements for new courses. The survey was circulated via e-mail to research staff and postgraduate students across three colleges of the University of Edinburgh: the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences; the College of Science and Engineering; and the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. The survey was conducted on-line using the Bristol Online Survey tool, March through July 2016. 191 responses were received.

Principal investigator(s):Ekmekcioğlu, Dr. Çuna, University of Edinburgh. Library and University Collections.

Date: 2016

  Scottish school leavers surveys (SSLS/SYPS)

Series abstract: The Scottish Government has sponsored surveys of school-leavers and young people since the early 1970s. These include the first incarnation of the Scottish School-Leavers Survey (SSLS) which, in the mid-1980s, was subsumed within the broader Scottish Young People's Survey (SYPS). In 1991 the survey was redesigned and resumed the title of the Scottish School-Leavers Survey. A further review in 1996 led to the establishment of the current design, which involves sampling cohorts of young people in fourth year and then collecting data from them on four occasions, at the ages of 16-17, 18-19, 21-22 and 23-24 years. The survey obtains information on the educational and employment activities and views of young people after they leave school, as well as background characteristics, such as parents' level of education and social class, family circumstances, and housing tenure.


Scottish school leavers survey, 1977

Access SDA data: merged file (AH, AS, NC, and all common variables files);

Abstract:This survey of 1975 and 1976 school leavers specifically covered the following topics: personal and background variables, school details, curriculum and attainment for all SCE levels, SCE O grade, SCE H grade, SYS, GCE and CSE, non-examined curriculum views on science, subject choice in s3, new subjects taken up after s3, methods of studying, the school timetable, behaviour and attitudes to school and teachers, views on exams, the decision to leave school, the sixth year and Sixth Year Studies, local amenities leaving home, vicational preparation, aspirations and attitudes on jobs and education, knowledge and perceptions of different sectors of Higher Education, applying to further education incl reasons, choices and preferences, looking for jobs, how present job was obtained, post-school destination, details of present full-time occupation, post-school education, and plans for future post-school courses. The merged datafile contains all variables for Higher presentees (AH), O level presentees (AS), non-certificate leavers (NC) as well as all common variables. Total n=20,972, with 1,210 variables.

Principal investigator(s): University of Edinburgh. Centre for Educational Sociology

Date: 1977

Documentation:

Scottish school leavers survey, 1979

Access SDA data: merged file (AH, AS, NC, and all common variables files)

Abstract: This survey of 1977 and 1978 school leavers specifically covered the following topics: personal and background variables, school details, curriculum and attainment for all SCE levels, SCE O grade, SCE H grade, SYS, GCE and CSE, non-examined curriculum views on science, subject choice in s3, new subjects taken up after s3, methods of studying, the school timetable, behaviour and attitudes to school and teachers, views on exams, the decision to leave school, the sixth year and Sixth Year Studies, local amenities leaving home, vicational preparation, aspirations and attitudes on jobs and education, knowledge and perceptions of different sectors of Higher Education, applying to further education incl reasons, choices and preferences, looking for jobs, how present job was obtained, post-school destination, details of present full-time occupation, post-school education, and plans for future post-school courses, job search, first job, Youth Opportunities Programme. Total n=8,864, with 986 variables.

Principal investigator(s): University of Edinburgh. Centre for Educational Sociology

Date: 1979

Documentation

Scottish school leavers survey, 1981

Access SDA data [Prelim. ed.]

Abstract: 1979 and 1980 school leavers were asked questions on stage/date of leaving school, general evaluation of school, subjects studied and examinations attempted (s4 to leaving), occupation in October 1980 and April 1981, post school education, YOP schemes, present job, number of jobs since school, father's occupation, family structure, and parents' education. In addition, subsets of respondents were asked about: truancy and discipline/corporal punishment, teacher guidance, attitudes to FE, staying on to fifth year or not, employers priorities for job seekers, attitude to job, supplementary benefit take-up, general aspirations, guidance at school, employers texts, classroom pattern in s4, evaluation of job training, sex education, sport and leisure, health education, home and school links.

Principal investigator(s): University of Edinburgh. Centre for Educational Sociology

Date: 1981

Documentation

Scottish school leavers survey, 1983

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Abstract: In March 1983 ten per cent of Scotland's school leavers who left school during the 1981/82 academic session were sent a questionnaire which contained questions about subjects studied and exams taken; about their decision to leave school and what next to do; and about the problems of securing work for those who were not in a job or on a course of further education. This survey was the fourth in a biennial series of surveys of all school leavers. 1981 and 1982 school leavers were asked questions on you and your school, fourth year and exams, third and fourth year subjects, staying on in school, fifth and sixth year courses, applying for college, college, post-school activity as in October 1982 and time of survey March/April 1983, details of Youth Opportunities Programme, work, and family.

Principal investigator(s): University of Edinburgh. Centre for Educational Sociology

Date: March to April, 1983

Documentation
  Student funding survey, 1989

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Abstract: The student Funding Survey focuses on funding of students in full-time higher education. It asked about the impact of proposed changes to funding of higher education in the UK, and feelings about the proposed changes. The questionnaire was distributed to universities and colleges throughout the UK, and was self-administered. The microdata file contains 805 respondents, and 91 variables.

Principal investigator(s): National Union of Students (NUS) of the United Kingdom

Date: 1989

Documentation

Health and Nutrition

  The effect of gender identity threat on food choices

Series abstract: Heart disease is the leading cause of death among men and unhealthy diets are a known contributing factor. UK policies such as front of pack labelling of food products and campaigns such as "Be food smart" are aimed to promote healthy eating practices. Data show that men benefit from these interventions less than women. One possible mechanism is that social norms about masculinity encourage men to eat meals rich in red meat and potatoes, and low on vegetables. We propose two Internet-based studies to test the hypothesis that in situations where men's masculinity is threatened, they will tend to choose foods that are perceived as more masculine, and that are also less healthy. In the first study, participants would rate food items (see The student diet 2014) on three scales: masculinity/femininity, healthiness/unhealthiness and palatability. In the second (experimental) study, male and female participants were randomly assigned to a gender identity threat or a gender identity affirmation condition (using the Conformity to Feminine Norms Inventory (CFNI), and then requested to choose between different food items. The prediction is that, following a masculinity threat, men would choose more masculine and less healthy foods, compared to the gender affirmation condition. We expect this effect not to occur among women.


The student diet, 2014

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Abstract: This survey aimed to establish what foods are typically eaten by students in the United Kingdom as preliminary information for later studies of gender identity and diet. Specifically, the survey aimed to uncover what foods were typically consumed by students as snacks, breakfast, lunch and dinner. Students were sent a link to an online survey via Facebook and through student email at a university in the United Kingdom. Students were asked to record demographic information, then list three foods that they typically ate for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and up to five typical snacks. In this dataset, demographic variables are coded variables, and food choices as string/free text variables. The survey of 116 students was conducted via Google Docs by means of a snowball sample.

Principal investigator(s): Newman, Emily and Kasia Banas

Date: 2014

Documentation

Student ratings of food masculinity, healthiness and palatability, 2015

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Abstract: This short study provided groundwork for later research looking at the effect of gender threat on food choices. In this current study, a snowball sample of 128 university students residing in the UK were recruited through email and Facebook and asked to rate various foods (a list of 64 foods informed by a previous survey, the Student diet, 2014) along dimensions of masculinity, healthiness and tastiness. In each case the dimensions were rated on a 5 point Likert scale. Foods rated represented the three main meals of the day and snacks. We used these ratings to work out which items were viewed as most and least masculine, then from this information generated three foods that could be classified as ‘masculine’, ‘neutral’ and ‘feminine’ for snacks, breakfast, lunch and dinner that were matched as well as possible for palatability. The WWW-based survey was conducted on a snowball sample of respondents using SurveyGizmo, in August and September 2015. Demographic variables include gender, height, weight, and BMI, country of origin, and ethnicity.

Principal investigator(s): Banas, Kasia and Emily Newman

Date: 2015

Documentation
Female identity threat and eating, 2015

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Abstract: In this, the second (experimental) study, female participants were randomly assigned to a gender identity threat or a gender identity affirmation condition via the Conformity to Feminine Norms Inventory (CFNI). Respondents were then requested to choose between different food items. The prediction is that, following a masculinity threat, men would choose more masculine and less healthy foods, compared to the gender affirmation condition. We expect this effect not to occur among women. This Prolific Academic sample of 127 female respondents was conducted online via Qualtrics, in November 2015.

Principal investigator(s): Newman, Emily and Kasia Banas

Date: 2015

Documentation
Male identity threat and eating, 2015

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Abstract: In this, the second (experimental) study, male participants were randomly assigned to a gender identity threat or a gender identity affirmation condition via the Conformity to Masculine Norms Inventory (CMNI). Respondents were then requested to choose between different food items. The prediction is that, following a masculinity threat, men would choose more masculine and less healthy foods, compared to the gender affirmation condition. This Prolific Academic sample of 129 male respondents was conducted online via Qualtrics, in November 2015.

Principal investigator(s): Newman, Emily and Kasia Banas

Date: 2015

Documentation
Activity manipulation and eating, 2015

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Abstract: The data come from a third in a series of experimental studies looking at the effect of gender identity threat on food choices. The hypothesis tested was that, when presented with a masculinity threat, men would choose more masculine foods. In this study, 136 male students were recruited online and invited to participate in a research study, ostensibly looking at students’ personality and eating. The questionnaire was set up in Qualtrics and distributed via Prolific Academic, which is an UK-based participant panel. Participants were presented with a 20-item questionnaire and told that it would assess personality. In fact, it was a lifestyle questionnaire created for the purposes of this study. Participants were then given bogus feedback, suggesting that their masculinity was either above average (affirmation condition) or below average (threat condition). Immediately after, participants were asked whether they believed the feedback was accurate, and whether they were pleased with the scores. The key outcome measure was a choice from an online menu- participants were asked to choose their breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack from a menu of 9 options, including 3 masculine, 3 feminine, and 3 neutral. Finally, we measured intentions to eat healthily and exercise, and identification with men as a social group. The results of the study showed no difference between the affirmation and threat group in the masculinity of their food choices. This may be due to the fact that participants did not find the feedback to be accurate, and those who received feedback threatening their masculinity were not finding it emotionally threatening. This Prolific Academic sample of 136 male respondents was conducted online via Qualtrics, in December 2015.

Principal investigator(s): Banas, Kasia and Emily Newman

Date: December 11-14, 2015

Documentation
  International stroke trial database, v.2 (corrected), 1996

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Abstract: The International Stroke Trial (IST) was conducted between 1991 and 1996 (including the pilot phase between 1991 and 1993). It was a large, prospective, randomised controlled trial, with 100% complete baseline data and over 99% complete follow-up data. The aim of the trial was to establish whether early administration of aspirin, heparin, both or neither influenced the clinical course of acute ischaemic stroke. The microdata files contains 19,435 cases, and 102 variables.

Principal investigator(s): Sandercock, Peter, Maciej Niewada, & Anna Czlonkowska and the International Stroke Trial Collaborative Group

Date: 1991-1996

Documentation
  •    Codebook>
  •    Report: International Stroke Trial Collaborative Group: the International Stroke Trial a randomized trial of aspirin, subcutaneous heparin, both or neither among 19 435 patients with acute ischemic stroke. Lancet 1997, 349:1569-1581
  Prevention in community nursing, 1989

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Abstract: Aka the 'Primary care nurses survey'. A survey of primary care nurses in the North East Thames Regional Health Authority. focusing on primary tasks re children, youth, and adults in the nurses' caseloads, administrative and other responsibilities, and views on disease prevention and health promotion. Qualifications and limited demographic variables. The microdata file includes data collected from 1,133 nurses, and 640 variables.

Principal investigator(s): Littlewood, Jenny, Centre for the Study of Primary Care, North East Thames Regional Health Authority

Date: 1989

Documentation

Population and Area Statistics

  Census microdata teaching file, 2011

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Abstract: The teaching files are a 2011 Census microdata product with a relatively small sample size and a low level of detail. They contain anonymised records on a limited set of variables for a random sample of 1% of people in the 2011 Census output databases for England and Wales, Northern Ireland, and Scotland respectively. The teaching files were made publically available on the WWW by the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA), and National Records of Scotland respectively, under the Open Government Licence. This version of the teaching files combines all 3 teaching files into one file, harmonises the coding of some variables, and adds a country code to facilitate comparative analyses. The data file contains 652,991 cases and 23 variables.

Principal investigator(s): Office for National Statistics (ONS), the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA), and National Records of Scotland (NRS)

Date: 2011

Documentation
  Scottish house condition survey, 2003/04-2013

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Abstract: The Scottish House Conditions Survey (SHCS) is an annual survey of Scottish domestic dwellings. Data in the public datasets are drawn from an interview with occupants and a follow-up inspection of their property by trained building surveyors.The SHCS covers five main areas in the interview and the dwelling inspection: general features of the dwelling, a description of the occupants, living conditions, energy efficiency, and a rural/urban indicator. This version of the dataset is created from the public microdata files available on the Scottish Government web site. It contains all years merged into one datafile, character variables recoded to numeric, and documentation from a number of sources. The data file contains 38,510 cases and 109 variables.

Principal investigator(s): Scottish Government/Riaghaltas na h-Alba

Date: 2003/04-2013

Documentation

Social Attitudes and Behaviour

  Survey of undergraduate technology use and attitudes, 2011

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Abstract:The original study on how students view ICT at the University of Edinburgh started in the 1990s. At that time, the University was concerned to increase its use of computer-based approaches in teaching and learning, but those involved soon became aware that such developments would require to be predicated upon the existing patterns of experience and attitude, both of staff and students, with regard to computers and information technology. The collection of some basic data provided the foundation necessary for the institution to develop its early policy and strategies on information technology literacy, and on the use of technologies in support of teaching and learning. Things change very quickly in the domain of information technology, and there was a perceived need to return to this data collection exercise on a biannual basis. This microdata file contains data collected from 580 respondents to a paper-based survey, consisting of a sample of first and second year University of Edinburgh students, and 40 variables.

Principal investigator(s): Macleod, Hamish & J. Paterson

Date: 2010-2011

Documentation

Socio-economic Studies

  Growing up in Scotland, cohort 1, sweep 6, 2010-2011 (subset)

Access SDA data [Registered users only. Users must first register their usage of the data set with UKDA (SN 5760), then contact University of Edinburgh Data Library for access]

Abstract: The Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) study, which began in 2005, is a large-scale longitudinal social survey which follows the lives of groups of Scotland's children from infancy through to their teens, and aims to provide new information on young children and their families in Scotland. The study forms a central part of the Scottish Government's strategy for the long-term monitoring and evaluation of its policies for children, with a specific focus on the early years.

Principal investigator(s): ScotCen Social Research

Date: 2010-2011

Documentation